Tipton

Remembers

Lieutenant Joseph Naylor


 Naylor Joseph 96 398x600


Killed in Action on Tuesday, 10th April 1917, age 54.
Commemorated on "Salta" Memorial in Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, Seine-Maritime, France.

Royal Army Medical Corps.

Son of Joseph and Elizabeth Naylor, of Kidderminster; husband of Alice Mary Naylor, of 37, Sedgley Rd., Tipton, Staffs. General Practitioner and Factory Surgeon of Tipton, for 24 years.
Born: Kidderminster, Enlisted: Unknown, Resident: Tipton.

First landed France & Flanders, post 31st December 1915.
Medal entitlement: British War Medal, Victory Medal.
Soldier's Papers at National Archives did not survive.

Commemorated on the Tipton Library Memorial.
Commemorated here because he appears on a Tipton memorial.

Link to Commonwealth War Graves Site: www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/4020655/


Genealogical Data

1901 Census
37 Owen Street, Tipton, Staffs.
Joseph Naylor (38, Physician & Surgeon, born Kidderminster), his wife Alice M. (31, born Lancaster), and their 2 daughters: Muriel (3) and Lois (2), both born Tipton.

1911 Census
37 Owen Street, Tipton, Staffs.
Joseph Naylor (48, Physician & Surgeon, born Kidderminster), his wife Alice Mary (4, born Lancaster), and their 3 surviving children of 4: Muriel Irene Horsfall (13, born Tipton), Lois Mary Horsfall (12, born Tipton), and Marjorie Noble (9, born Tipton).


Personal Data

Joseph was educated at St Bartholomew's Hospital - entering as a student of medicine in 1883, he obtained the diplomas of M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. in 1889. He served as house-surgeon to the Derbyshire General Infirmary and went into practice at Tipton Green, Staffordshire. Joseph obtained a temporary commission in the R.A.M.C. at the rank of Lieutenant in October 1916.
Courtesy of www.ramc-ww1.com


Action resulting in his death

The sinking of His Majesty's Hospital Ship "Salta", 10th April 1917.

'Salta' was chartered by the English Admiralty in February 1915 from the French Talabot Company and converted to a hospital ship (H.M.H.S. according to the nomenclature in force in the Royal Navy - His Majesty' s Hospital Ship). In accordance with the Hague Convention of 1894, the steamer was painted white with a broad horizontal green band with red crosses, theoretically protecting it from attack.

On the night of the 9th to 10th April 1917, 'Salta', accompanied by 'Lanfranc', 'Western Australia' and an escort of destroyers, steamed from Southampton to the naval base of Le Havre. During the morning of the 10th April, a French patrol craft had found mines drifting in the Le Havre approaches and all vessels entering the port were to be warned. The mines had been laid the previous day by the German mine-laying submarine UC 26.

At 11.20am, 'Salta' approached the port entrance and stopped engines. A patrol craft instructed the 'Salta' convoy to follow it towards the English drifter "Diamond" which checked the identity of each ship before opening the barrage allowing entry into the port. Satisfied, the drifter gives its green light and 'Salta' was authorised to continue.

Whilst following the buoyed channel into Le Havre, 'Salta's' Captain Eastaway gave orders to alter course to the north. The commander of the 'Diamond' relayed a frantic message that Salta was now approaching the zone where mines had been seen that morning. One of the 'Salta's' surviving officers reported that Eastaway was concerned about entering Le Havre without a pilot because of the bad weather and had wanted to let the other ships pass.

Realising that they were in grave danger, Eastaway tried to re-trace his course back to the buoyed channel. In poor weather conditions, 'Salta' drifted across the mined zone and hit a mine at 11.43am. An enormous explosion breached the hull near the engine room and hold number three. Water engulfed the disabled ship, which listed to starboard and sank in less than 10 minutes, half a mile north of Whistle Buoy.

Despite help arriving rapidly, the state of the sea and the strong winds hampered the rescue operation and the human cost was appalling. Of 205 passengers and crew, 9 nurses, 42 wounded and 79 crew perished. In spite of extensive searches, only 13 bodies were initially recovered. There are now 24 burials from the sinking of the 'Salta' in Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, and also a memorial to those who were not recovered.

The sinking of the 'Salta' had another victim. The English patrol craft 'P-26' was involved in the rescue operations and hit another mine, the ship was split in two and sank.

'Salta' is believed to lie in 138 metres of water at 49°32'08N 00°02'18W.


Newspaper Cuttings

Tipton Herald 9th April 1916
Dr Naylor of Owen Street is serving as a Medical Officer on active service. His practice is in charge of a locum tenens.

Tipton Herald 6th January 1917
Dr Walter Loades (65) of Owen Street, Tipton, was ordered to pay 5s for allowing a light to be seen from a downstairs window in the house of Dr Naylor contrary to the Defence of the Realm Act.

Tipton Herald 21st April 1917
THE LATE DR. NAYLOR.
Never perhaps had the awfulness of war come so startlingly home to the residents of Tipton, who so far have been spared the loss of any relative in the conflict, as on Saturday morning when the sad news was first received that Dr. Naylor of Owen Street, Tipton, who only volunteered as an army surgeon in October last, had met his death in the sinking of a hospital ship.
Among the many abominable outrages which the coldly calculating but fiendish mind of the Hun deliberately engineer is that of the deliberate sinking, without warning, of hospital ships. It was felt that the ill-fated doctor had indeed offered up his life in the cause of the sorely stricken of our gallant soldiers. In this case they would be returning from the battlefield for hospital treatment in England, but Dr. Naylor had given his services absolutely willingly to go anywhere - to the awful din and horror of the Casualty Clearing Station behind the firing line, to the calmer atmosphere of the base hospital, or to the more dangerous occupation of hospital ship doctor. The late Dr. Naylor was a man of great integrity and uprightness of character. He was extremely skilful in his profession; and was liked and trusted by those who had need of his services.

also..
THE LATE DR. NAYLOR.
A VICTIM OF ILL-FATED HOSPITAL SHIP.
On Saturday morning last Tipton people heard with consternation and grief the sad news that Dr. Joseph Naylor of Owen Street, Tipton, had been lost in the sinking of His Majesty's Hospital Ship "Salta", which occurred in the English Channel on the previous Tuesday as the result of striking a mine.
The late Dr. Naylor had practiced in Tipton for over 20 years, having succeeded to the practice of Dr. W.L. Underwood and Sons. He was born at Kidderminster, being the son of the late Dr. Joseph Naylor, J.P., who was once Mayor of Kidderminster. Prior to coming to Tipton he was the House Surgeon to the Derbyshire Infirmary, and had already seen medical service afloat. He joined the Army in October of last year, volunteering for service at home or abroad as surgeon to H.M. Forces. He was first stationed at Sunderland. In March he was appointed to H.M. Hospital Ship 'Asturias' which was sunk by the Huns, but he was not on board at the time. At the end of last month, Dr. Naylor was home on a short leave of absence, and left England about Tuesday of last week on the ill-fated "Salta" which was destroyed as above stated. The deceased doctor had also done duty on hospital trains, and was also employed in embarkation duty. Only a few days before she sailed he was appointed to H.M.S. "Salta" which was a twin-screw steamer of over 6000 tonnes.
On board the "Salta" were several Army doctors, about a dozen nursing sisters and fifty men of the R.A.M.C. all of whom are reported missing which can only signify that they were killed by the explosion or drowning. All the friends were informed by the Admiralty that their relatives were presumed to be drowned. The late Dr. Naylor was the factory surgeon for the parish of Tipton, and was on the medical panel. He was about 52 years of age and leaves a widow and three daughters, with whom heart-felt sympathy has been expressed.

Tipton Herald 28th April 1917
THE FATE OF DR. NAYLOR.
The above is a photograph of Dr. Joseph Naylor of Owen Street, Tipton, who to the grief of Tipton people, was lost in the sinking of His Majesty's Hospital Ship "Salta", which occurred in the English Channel on Tuesday, 10th April as the result of striking a mine. Some particulars appeared in our last issue.
Dr. Naylor joined the Army in October of last year, volunteering for service at home or abroad as surgeon to H.M. Forces. He was first stationed at Sunderland. In March he was appointed to H.M. Hospital Ship 'Asturias' which was sunk by the Huns, but he was not on board at the time. At the end of last month, Dr. Naylor was home on a short leave of absence, and left England about the 10th inst on the ill-fated "Salta" which was destroyed as above stated. The deceased doctor had also done duty on hospital trains, and was also employed in embarkation duty. He was appointed to H.M.S. "Salta", which was a twin-screw steamer of over 6000 tonnes, only a few days before the vessel sailed.
On board the "Salta" were several Army doctors, about a dozen nursing sisters and forty men of the R.A.M.C. all of whom are reported missing.
A memorial service to the late Dr. Naylor will be held on Sunday evening at St. Paul's Church.
We are enabled to give the above photo of Dr. Naylor through the courtesy of the Midlands Counties Express, Wolverhampton.

also...
THE LATE DR. NAYLOR.
A memorial service to the late Dr. Joseph Naylor, drowned in the sinking of H.M. Hospital Ship "Salta", will be held at St. Paul's Church, Owen Street, on Sunday evening.
The Chairman of the District council, at the request of the vicar of the Church (Rev. G.E. Lythgoe), has asked his fellow members to attend.

Tipton Herald 5th May 1917
THE LATE DR. NAYLOR.
MEMORIAL SERVICE AT ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, TIPTON.
On Sunday evening last a memorial service for Dr. Joseph Naylor, R.A.M.C., of Tipton, who was attached to H.M. Hospital Ship "Salta", mined in the English Channel on April 10th, was held at St. Paul's Church, Owen Street, Tipton. The service was conducted by the vicar (Rev. G.E. Lythgoe) and the Rev. F.N. Fletcher (assistant clergyman at St. Martin's). As testifying to the widespread regard which the lamentable death of the esteemed doctor called forth, the church was filled to the limit of its seating capacity on the ground floor, many finding accommodation in the galleries.
The Chairman of Tipton Urban District Council (Councillor W.W. Doughty, J.P., C.C.) and most of his fellow members were present together with the local officials. The whole parish of Tipton, as well as outside areas where the deceased doctor was known, were represented by members of both Church of England and Non-Conformist churches, doctors and private citizens. The widow of the deceased and her family were also present. The 1st Tipton Baden Powell Boy Scouts attended as well as the members of Tipton St. John Ambulance Brigade (in their new uniforms) and the special constables.
The prayers were intoned by the Rev. F.N. Fletcher, who also read the first lesson. The second lesson was read by the late doctor's oldest colleague, Dr. A.S. Underhill. The opening hymn was "Fight the good fight with all thy might", the other hymns being "Nearer my God to thee" and "O God our help in ages past". "O rest in the Lord" was sung as a solo. The ordinary evening service was abandoned to give place to the solemn funeral service.
The vicar (Rev. G.E. Lythgoe) chose as the text for his remarks the words from the Burial Service, viz, "The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death." They were all aware, he said, of the special occasion which caused them to gather at that church that evening. It was sad to think that another disaster to a hospital vessel had occurred on the 10th April, H.M.S. "Salta" sinking so suddenly and unexpectedly. Dr. Naylor, their near neighbour, with other medical men, nursing sisters and members of the R.A.M.C. being drowned. They realised how sad it was that death should in such an untimely and sudden fashion have overtaken their friend, who so willingly volunteered to do duty for King and country, with the others he had mentioned, in the midst of their humane efforts to alleviate the suffering of their brave soldiers and sailors. They could ill afford to lose doctors at the present time, whether at the front or at home for so many were required, and the toll of the brave had been so heavy. One felt sure that the loss of Dr. Naylor would be felt in the parish in which he had laboured for so many years. They could only hope that to the members of his family left to mourn his irreparable loss, would be vouchsafed the grace of the Redeemer, to bear their loss with calm fortitude, knowing that their loved one had given his life for others.
At the close of the service a bugle of the scouts played "The Last Post" which was followed by the Dead march in "Saul" on the organ.

also...
THANKS
Mrs Naylor and family (Tipton) desire to express their thanks for the great kindness and sympathy shown by all to them in their great sorrow.

Tipton Herald 2nd June 1917
TIPTON DISTRICT COUNCIL.
THE LATE DR. NAYLOR.
A letter was read from the widow of the late Dr. Joseph Naylor thanking the council for their letter of condolence with her in the loss of her husband.

Tipton Herald 4th May 1918
An advert was placed for the Auction of Dr Naylor's effects on May 15th and 16th 1918. This covered household possessions, his professional surgical equipment, and his 1915 Ford touring car.