Tipton

Remembers

Rifleman Z/2207 George Fellows


 Fellows George 96 436x600


Killed in Action on Tuesday, 26th September 1916, age 21.
Commemorated on Panel 129 of Loos Memorial, Pas De Calais, France.

2nd Bn., Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own). 25th Div Brigade of 8th Division.

Husband of Mrs Sarah A. Fellows, of 70 Crocketts Lane, Smethwick, Staffs.
Born: Tipton, Enlisted: West Bromwich, Resident: Smethwick.

First landed France & Flanders, 27th December 1914.
Medal entitlement: 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal.
Soldier's Papers at National Archives survived and transcribed.

Commemorated on the St. Peter's, Greets Green Memorial.
Commemorated here because identified as Tipton on 'Soldiers Died in the Great War'.

Link to Commonwealth War Graves Site: www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2942253/


Genealogical Data

1901 Census
4 Railway Street, Tipton, Staffs.
Thomas Fellows (51, Slack Boat Unloader, born Madeley), his wife Mary A. (56, born Tipton), and their 4 children: Thomas (18, Slack Boat Loader, born Tipton), Benjamin (16, Iron Worker, born Tipton), Edward (12, born Tipton), and George (6, born Tipton).

1911 Census
9 Canalside, Brickhouse Lane, Great Bridge, Staffs.
Thomas Fellows (61, No Occupation, born West Bromwich), and 2 of his children: George (16, Warehouseman at Iron Works, born Tipton), and Benjamin (23, Labourer, born West Bromwich), plus Benjamin's wife Elizabeth (22, born Tipton), and 2 children: Benjamin (2, born West Bromwich), and George (9 months, born Tipton). 

Marriage of George Fellows and Sarah A. Reeves registered December quarter 1913 in King's Norton.
The birth and death of their son George Fellows was registered in September quarter 1914 in West Bromwich.


Personal Data

George and Benjamin Fellows were brothers.

George's Soldier's Papers exist, but were numbered 2297.

George was born in Brickhouse Lane, Great Bridge, Tipton in 1895. He enlisted with the Rifle Brigade on 2nd September 1914 at West Bromwich Town Hall. He was aged 19 years 208 days, newly married to Mary Ann Fellows and living 70 Crocketts Lane, Smethwick. He was 5 feet 8¼ inches tall with a 36½-inch chest, weighed 138 pounds and had 'good' physical development. He had a sallow complexion, hazel eyes and brown hair, was Church of England and employed as a Furnaceman.

After training at Sheerness, he was posted to the 2nd Bn. Rifle Brigade in France on 27th December 1914, after less than 4 months in training. He was wounded in action on 10th March 1915, the opening day of the battle of Neuve Chapelle. He was evacuated back to England on 16th March and returned to France 4 months later on 16th July.

An army form after his death listed his parents as Thomas and Mary Ann Fellows, of 7 Canalside, Brickhouse Lane, Great Bridge, Tipton; he had3 brothers and 2 sisters 3 brothers and 2 sisters. George's widow, Mary Ann, was awarded a pension for herself (no children) of 13 shillings and 9 pence per week from 16th April 1917.


Action resulting in his death

On 26th September 1916 the 2nd Rifle Brigade was in trenches at Hohenzollern Redoubt, near Vermelles. Between 7.30am and 11.00am, the enemy bombarded their position with artillery and trench mortars. A minenwerfer hit a trench and five men were buried under the debris, unfortunately it was not possible to dig the men out. The 5 men were Privates Bullard, Figgin, Humphrey, Tiler and George Fellows. None of them have a known grave, and all are commemorated on the Loos Memorial.


Newspaper Cuttings

Due to incompetence, the source of this article was not recorded.
RIFLEMAN GEORGE FELLOWS.
"He was splendid while in the trenches. Always in good spirits, even when things were not too bright. He will be the greatest loss to the Battalion, and I shall miss him very much indeed. Please accept my sympathy in your great loss, as I know he must have been a splendid husband." This the Commanding Officer writes to Mrs Fellows, 70, Crocketts Lane, Smethwick, in conveying the sad news that her husband was killed in action on the 26th September.
Rifleman Fellows is one of those who went "at the first call" in 1914, and had been in France two years. He was wounded last year, and came home in December last. A brother of Rifleman Fellows has been missing since August 1915. (Editor: Probably Pte 15139 Benjamin Fellows, 7th South Staffs, killed in action 9th August 1915).
There is much sympathy with Mrs. Fellows, who is associated with St. Stephen's Church, Smethwick.
Prior to the outbreak of war, George Fellows was employed at Muntz's Works, Great Bridge. He was held in great respect, being described as "one of the best".
The Chaplain sends a comforting message to Mrs. Fellows. He says: "May I just remind you of what you must know and that is, that death is not the end of these men, but it is the entry into a new and fuller life beyond the grave. May God comfort you, and help you to realise this more and more."

Evening Despatch October 21st 1916
SMETHWICK ROLL OF HONOUR
Rifleman George Fellows was killed in action at the end of September. Writing to Mrs. Fellows, who resides at Crocketts Lane, Smethwick, the commanding officer says: "He was splendid while in the trenches; always in good spirits, even when things were not too bright. He will be the greatest loss to the Battalion, and I shall miss him very much indeed."

Evening Despatch November 15th 1916
SMETHWICK SOLDIER KILLED.
Mrs. Fellows,of 70 Crocketts Lane, Smethwick, has received news of the death of her husband, Rifleman George Fellows. His commanding officer has written to say: "He was splendid while in the trenches. Always in good spirits, even when things were not too bright. He will be the greatest loss to the Battalion, and I shall miss him very much indeed. I know he must have been a splendid husband."
Rifleman Fellows was one of the first men in Smethwick to answer the call, and had been in France two years. He was wounded last year, and was home in December 1915.
A brother has been missing since August 1915.